Animal Stories

A Tribute to Barney

by Andrea Hartley

Barney 3

My dog Barney lived to age 20, after being diagnosed with Cushion’s Disease at the age of 14, and given 6 months to live.  The doctors were amazed.  When I had brought him in to see the vet, his stomach was very swollen.  When I returned with him a few months later, the doctor said his stomach had returned to normal.  What had I done?  I had stopped feeding him dog food and started feeding him the way I fed my family, with good wholesome food.  I do not buy any processed foods.  I do not buy any foods with artificial colors, flavors, preservatives  or MSG products in it.  I serve only natural, organic when possible, cooked from scratch food, and now, this was what Barney was eating too.  He had  turkey, beef, organic chicken, cabbage, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, brown rice, green beans, peas, apples, and yogurt (plain with no additives).  I also gave him vitamins, herbs, and some homeopathic remedies. [Read more]

 

The Miracle Bird

by Gary Frisch

003

In February of 2009, I got my kids a pet parakeet, which we named Twitter. This was a special bird, and warmed to my family right away.  He was blue, white and grey, very distinctive looking.  His wings had been clipped so he could flap around but couldn’t sustain prolonged flight.  We gave Twitter a lot of freedom to explore our apartment, knowing he’d return to the comfort of his cage soon enough.

On Dec. 27 that year, Twitter escaped from our third floor apartment when my 10-year-old son left the sliding door to our deck open for a few minute.  A family search of the apartment complex yielded nothing. [Read more about Twitter]

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Blind Dog Gives Owner Insight

LambchopMany years ago,  I visited a shelter to find a dog.  As I went from cage-to-cage, I saw many friendly ones and some shy ones, but the one that stood out most to me was a little poodle mix who was elderly and blind.  I felt that no one would want him, so he was the one for me.  The shelter, very kindly described me as a “saint” and decided that they should waive the adoption fee.  They were nice.  Looking back, it is interesting that they used the word “saint’ but they should have used it to describe the dog because he taught me many life lessons. That tiny, old dog had a spirit and a will larger than life.   I decided to call him “Lamb Chop” after Shari Lewis’s puppet.     “Undaunted” would be a great word to describe his spirit.  Though he couldn’t see and was up in years, he never let that stop him.  I really should have called him “Mr. Magoo” because, like the cartoon character, his lack of sight had him involved in a ton of near misses and dilemmas. [Read about Lamb Chop dilemmas]

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Freed From a Dungeon

This poor cat had been kept in a windowless basement for 11 years.  The people keeping him there had minimal interaction with him.  Occasionally their Jack Russel terriors would get into the basment and terrorize him.  A young woman started boarding with them and was horrified by this situation.  When they were not around, she would bring the cat up to her room.  She discovered that he had blood dripping from his mouth because of severe dental problems.  At this point she contacted No Kill Lehigh Valley.  We immediately arranged for  a foster home and paid  $450.00 for his veterinary care.  And, we struck gold when one of our members found him a real home.  He is shown here in the arms of his new mom who says that he is the sweetest cat she has ever knwon – and she’s known a lot of cats.  He now spends his days looking out of her glass doors at the world he couldn’t see before and he is doted on and much loved.

No Kill Lehigh Valley is a non- profit animal welfare group that fills a very special niche in our community. We provide financial assistance for veterinary care and spay/neuter surgeries.  Our goal is to keep companion animals in their homes whenever possible by providing this financial help and other support through our e mail group (nokill.lehighvalley@yahoo.com), website (www.nokilllv.com), and Facebook.

No Kill Lehigh Valley was founded in 2007 as the result of a growing concern about the high rate of killing at the Lehigh Co. Humane Society.  We believe that no animal should have to die just because it’s homeless.   We support efforts to reduce the  companion animal population through humane measures and to provide people  with the support they need to keep and care for their animals.

Low cost spay/neuter services are an essential part of this equation.  We support the local low cost clinics and supplement their fees when people are unable to afford them.  Since January of this year we have expended over $13,000.00 for spay/neuter surgeries.  In addition to paying for companion cats to be spayed/neutered, we pay for the surgeries on feral cats through trap/neuter/return programs.  We also believe that companion animals should not have to suffer just because their human companions cannot pay for veterinary care.  So far this year we have provided  over $36,000.00 in veterinary costs.  We have financed  care ranging from kittens with infected eyes to dogs with broken bones who require expensive surgery by a board certified surgeon.

Our services are desperately needed in these difficult economic times.  People who love their animals suffer terribly when they cannot afford to care for them so, while our main goal is to help the animals, we are helping people too.   While our work is primarily fund raising, we also are involved in making municipal officials and politicians aware of the importance of companion animals and the needs of those who care for them.

Remember, the most important thing you can do if you care about animals is to make sure your cat(s) and/ or dog(s) are spayed and neutered.

Low Cost Spay Neuter Clinics :

Peaceable Kingdom   610-432-2532 (Allentown)

No Nonsense Neutering  866-820-2510   (Allentown)

Eastern Pa. Animal Alliance   570-994-5846  (Broadheadsville)

If you would like to support our work, you can do so in many ways.  Become a part of our e mail group so that you will be informed about our activities and local animal related issues.  Just send an e mail to nokill.lehighvalley@yahoo.com and we’ll add you to the list.   Suggest/hold  a fund raiser – we’re open to all ideas.  Or, just donate by sending a check to NKLV PO Box 4272 Bethlehem, Pa. 18018 or by Paypal.  All donations are tax deductible and all funds stay right here in our communities to help the animals and the people who love them.

[Read more…]

Are You Reacting to MSG?

    If you experience food sensitivities, rapid heartbeat, headache, stomach problems or migraine, you may be reacting to MSG in your food, cleaning products, even lawn fertilizers.  Below is an excerpt from the web site Truth in Labeling where you can learn about the toxic effects of MSG.  Also, look for the book, “The Taste that Kills”, by Russell  Blaylock, M.D.

WWW.truthinlabeling.org —

Types of products that contain MSG

In general…

MSG can be used (and hidden) in processed foods, dietary supplements, cosmetics, personal care products, pharmaceuticals, and the food that is given to pets and other animals.  It can be used in waxes applied to fresh fruits and vegetables.  It can be used as ingredients in pesticides, fungicides, fertilizers, and plant growth enhancers — remaining in the edible portion of the plant or on the edible portion of the plant when its leaves, fruits, nuts, grains, seeds, and other edible parts are brought to market.

There are over 40 food ingredients besides “monosodium glutamate” that contain processed free glutamic acid (MSG). Each, according to the FDA, must be called by its own, unique, “common or usual name.”   “Autolyzed yeast,” “maltodextrin,” “hydrolyzed pea protein”, and “sodium caseinate” are the common or usual names of some ingredients that contain MSG.  Unlike the ingredient called “monosodium glutamate,” they give the consumer no clue that there is MSG in the ingredient.

In addition to ingredients that contain MSG, some acids and enzymes when combined with a food that contains protein will produce MSG.  The words “enzyme” and “protease” (which is a type of enzyme) signal the presence of enzymes capable of causing the production of MSG.

In particular…

– Low fat and no fat milk products often contain milk solids that contain MSG. Other dairy products often contain carrageenan, guar gum, and/or locust bean gum. Low fat and no fat versions of ice cream and cheese may not be as obvious as yogurt, milk, cream, cream cheese, cottage cheese, etc., but they are not exceptions.

– Protein powders and protein drinks contain glutamic acid, and the glutamic acid in the protein powders and drinks will always be processed (manufactured) free glutamic acid (MSG).  Individual amino acids are not always listed on labels of protein powders and drinks.

– At present, there is an FDA requirement to give the name of the protein source when listing hydrolyzed protein products on labels of processed foods.  Examples are hydrolyzed soy protein, hydrolyzed wheat protein, hydrolyzed pea protein, hydrolyzed whey protein, hydrolyzed, corn protein. If a tomato, for example, were whole, it would be identified as a tomato. Naming an ingredient “tomato protein” indicates that the tomato has been hydrolyzed, at least in part, and that processed free glutamic acid (MSG) is present.

– At present, the FDA requires the disclosure of ingredients labeled “monosodium glutamate” and “hydrolyzed…protein” when, as ingredients, they are used in a “flavor” or “flavoring” (whether or not the “flavor” or “flavoring” is preceded by the words “natural” or “artificial”).  However, “flavors” and “flavorings” can contain MSG in ingredients other than “monosodium glutamate” and “hydrolyzed…Protein” without the MSG being disclosed.

– Disodium guanylate and disodium inosinate are relatively expensive food additives that work synergistically with inexpensive processed free glutamic acid (MSG).  We believe that they would only be used if there was MSG in a product.

– MSG will be found in some soaps, shampoos, hair conditioners, and cosmetics, where MSG is hidden in ingredients with names that include the words “hydrolyzed,” “amino acids,” and/or “protein.”

– Binders and fillers for prescription and non-prescription medications, nutrients, and supplements, may contain MSG.

– Enteral feeding materials, and some fluids administered intravenously in hospitals, may contain MSG.

– According to the manufacturer, Varivax–Merck chicken pox vaccine (Varicella Virus Live), contains L-monosodium glutamate and hydrolyzed gelatin, both of which contain processed free glutamic acid (MSG).  It would appear that most, if not all, live virus vaccines contain some ingredient(s) that contains MSG.

– There are a number of ingredients identified as organic that, organic or not, will contain processed free glutamic acid (MSG).  Autolyzed yeast, yeast extract, textured soy protein, and anything hydrolyzed are examples of ingredients that may be made from organic produce, but will never-the-less contain MSG.

– Drinks, candy, and chewing gum are potential sources of hidden MSG.  They may also contain aspartame, neotame, of AminoSweet (the new name for aspartame).  We mention aspartame, neotame, and AminoSweet here because they, like MSG, contain a neurotoxic amino acid, and can cause the same reactions that MSG causes.

– Aspartame will be found in some medications, including children’s medications.

Anything that breaks down the protein in a product can produce MSG as it breaks down that protein. There have been reports of people reacting to meat wrapped in Cryovac. Cryovac is a registered trademark for a thick plastic in which meat is sealed with the air removed by a vacuum pump. The word Cryovac is also used for the thermoplastic resin wrapping film which can be heat-shrunk onto foods.  – Some waxes used on fruits and vegetables contain MSG.

– Produce may have been produced using fertilizer or pesticide products that contain MSG.  Some of these fertilizers may be organic.  It is impossible to know from looking at produce whether or not it has been treated with an MSG-containing fertilizer or pesticide product that leaves residue in or on the produce.

– Some non-organic waxes used on some fruits and vegetables contain MSG.

– Additional sources of MSG include infant formula, kosher food, enteral feeding products (tube feeding products), dietary supplements, pharmaceuticals, protein drinks often recommended for seniors, protein bars and protein powders, vaccines, personal care products, protein powders sold in health food stores, food that is labeled “organic”, wine, food with labels that say “No Added MSG,” “No MSG Added,” or “No MSG” , food that is falsely advertised as containing no MSG, and in food whose manufacturers claim, in response to questions, that their products contain no MSG.

MSG can be hidden by restaurateurs who claim that the food they serve contains no MSG

About “organic” products…

Where MSG is concerned, “organic” doesn’t mean “safe”.  Ingredients like organic autolyzed yeast and organic natural flavoring have just as much processed (manufactured) free glutamic acid (MSG) in them as those not called “organic.”  Following are products labeled “organic” that have come to our attention as containing processed free glutamic acid (MSG).  There are others.

Product: Vegetable Bouillon
By: Morga
Ingredients include: Yeast extract; Maltodextrin

Product: macaroni & cheese dinner
By: Simply Organic
Ingredients include: Natural flavors; Autolyzed yeast extract

Also listed as organic are fertilizer products that contain hydrolyzed fish protein and hydrolyzed chicken feathers.  All hydrolyzed ingredients contain MSG.

About “Health Food” stores…

Health food stores are mine fields for MSG.  Protein powders are generally nothing more or less than hydrolyzed proteins –and will contain all three manufactured neurotoxic amino acids: glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and L-cysteine.  Food labeled “organic” cannot legitimately contain monosodium glutamate, but can contain other ingredients that contain MSG.  Dietary supplements will often contain individual amino acids (because they can be absorbed by the body more quickly than amino acids found in protein which have to be digested before they can be absorbed); and if dietary supplements contain individual amino acids, those amino acids may be neurotoxic glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and/or L-cysteine, all manufactured in food and/or chemical plants.

These are the names of some of the MSG-containing ingredients often found in Health Food stores:

amino acids (They almost invariably contain glutamic acid.)
autolyzed yeast
citric acid

glutamate
glutamic acid
hydrolyzed protein
monopotassium glutamate
monosodium glutamate
protein
whey protein concentrate

There are also chelates.  Minerals found individually and in some multi-vitamins, are usually joined to amino acids for better absorption, i.e., the minerals or multi-vitamins are chelated.  The following are names used for chelates that will contain MSG and/or aspartic acid and phenylalanine which are two of the main ingredients in MSG’s toxic cousin aspartame:

amino acid chelate (chelated with amino acids)
potassium (or any other mineral ) citrate
potassium (or any other mineral) aspartate
potassium (or any other mineral) glutamate
chelated with hydrolyzed protein,
chelated with protein
chelated with amino acids

Some supplement manufacturers place asterisks after the names of minerals.  Below the list of ingredients, the asterisk is often followed by a note that explains that the mineral is “chelated with hydrolyzed protein,” “chelated with protein,” or “chelated with amino acids.”

Protein powders are all the rage for body builders and older people.  The main ingredient is typically a hydrolyzed protein — and hydrolyzed proteins contain MSG, excitotoxic aspartic acid (found also in aspartame), and excitotoxic L-cysteine (found in some dough conditioners).  We have concern for anyone who ingests any form of MSG in his or her diet.  We have extreme concern for athletes who ingest MSG just prior to, just following, or in the course of vigorous exercise, because there is evidence that the adverse effects of MSG may be intensified by vigorous exercise.  Heart irregularities have been know to be caused by ingestion of MSG and/or aspartame.  Heart irregularities can result in cardiac arrest.

About hospitals, nursing homes, and extended care facilities…

The most common sources of MSG in hospitals, nursing homes, and extended care facilities will be:

Soups – even if the institution purchases soups and/or soup bases that claim to be MSG-free

Protein drinks such as Boost and Ensure

Enteral care products – used when tube feeding

Gelatin

Gravies

Salad dressings

Intravenous solutions.  Reactions have been reported to saline solution and solutions containing dextrose.  Ringers solution appears to be MSG-free.

Anything no fat or low fat

Anything made with a sugar substitute likely contains neurotoxic aspartame, Equal, or AminoSweet.

People with extreme intolerance to MSG have difficulty with pharmaceuticals that contain MSG in the binders and/or fillers.  They may also react to the starch on powdered gloves and/or the contacts that are glued to a patient’s chest for heart monitoring.  The contact points that touch the body may contain guar gum which, after serveral days’ exposure, may cause adverse reactions.

About pet food…

It’s not only humans that have problems with MSG.  The first evidence of MSG toxicity came from animal studies, some of which demonstrated that animals suffered brain lesions and endocrine disorders when fed monosodium glutamate.  The possibility that your animal is sensitive to MSG is certainly worth considering.  We have received the following from consumers:

________________________

Subj:          Pet Food & MSG

Date:          8/17/2004 1.48:20 AM Central Standard Time

Dear Folks,  would you consider adding an article on MSG in our Pet Food.  Just about all the grocery store dog food and most of the canned cat food has various products with an msg base.  What can we do about this???   Our pets are much smaller than we are and surely this is extremely bad for their small frame.  God help us all.  Also, how about my favorite ice cream which is Haagen Daz.   I eat the simple flavors, Vanilla, Chocolate, Butter Pecan.  I eat it because the original flavors are cream, skim milk, vanilla, chocolate.  Anyways, thank you for being here.  God Bless your work.  M.D.

_______________________

From: D
To: adandjack@aol.com
Sent: 1/24/2009 2:07:06 P.M. Central Standard Time
Subj: MSG

Our bichpoo dog (6 yrs) ate some sweet & sour pork (left over from Chinese take out).  Almost immediately he began to exhibit hyperness, running & jumping, and almost seemed to be “high” on something.  He seemed disoriented and didn’t settle down for almost six hours.  The vet said he had never seen a dog show these symptoms from eating food.  Could he be extremely sensitive to MSG or have you ever heard of this in an animal?  Obviously no more people food for Buster.  Thanks

Beyond MSG…

People who are sensitive to processed free glutamic acid (MSG), or those who simply would choose to avoid ingestion of toxic amino acids, need to know that there are two other neurotoxic amino acids commonly used in food: aspartic acid and L-cysteine. Aspartic acid is found in the sugar substitutes called “neotame”, “aspartame”, “AminoSweet”, “NutraSweet” and “Equal.”  L-cysteine is identified as L-cysteine and is most often found in dough conditioners.

Puppy Mending From Broken Leg

No Kill Lehigh Valley is a non- profit animal welfare group that fills a very special niche in our community. We provide financial assistance for veterinary care and spay/neuter surgeries.  Our goal is to keep companion animals in their homes whenever possible by providing this financial help and other support through our e mail group (nokill.lehighvalley@yahoo.com), website (www.nokilllv.com), and Facebook.

No Kill Lehigh Valley was founded in 2007 as the result of a growing concern about the high rate of killing at the Lehigh Co. Humane Society.  We believe that no animal should have to die just because it’s homeless.   We support efforts to reduce the  companion animal population through humane measures and to provide people  with the support they need to keep and care for their animals.

Low cost spay/neuter services are an essential part of this equation.  We support the local low cost clinics and supplement their fees when people are unable to afford them.  Since January of this year we have expended over $13,000.00 for spay/neuter surgeries.  In addition to paying for companion cats to be spayed/neutered, we pay for the surgeries on feral cats through trap/neuter/return programs.  We also believe that companion animals should not have to suffer just because their human companions cannot pay for veterinary care.  So far this year we have provided  over $36,000.00 in veterinary costs.  We have financed  care ranging from kittens with infected eyes to dogs with broken bones who require expensive surgery by a board certified surgeon.

Our services are desperately needed in these difficult economic times.  People who love their animals suffer terribly when they cannot afford to care for them so, while our main goal is to help the animals, we are helping people too.   While our work is primarily fund raising, we also are involved in making municipal officials and politicians aware of the importance of companion animals and the needs of those who care for them.

Remember, the most important thing you can do if you care about animals is to make sure your cat(s) and/ or dog(s) are spayed and neutered.

Low Cost Spay Neuter Clinics :

Peaceable Kingdom   610-432-2532 (Allentown)

No Nonsense Neutering  866-820-2510   (Allentown)

Eastern Pa. Animal Alliance   570-994-5846  (Broadheadsville)

If you would like to support our work, you can do so in many ways.  Become a part of our e mail group so that you will be informed about our activities and local animal related issues.  Just send an e mail to nokill.lehighvalley@yahoo.com and we’ll add you to the list.   Suggest/hold  a fund raiser – we’re open to all ideas.  Or, just donate by sending a check to NKLV PO Box 4272 Bethlehem, Pa. 18018 or by Paypal.  All donations are tax deductible and all funds stay right here in our communities to help the animals and the people who love them.

_____________________________________________________________ [Read more…]